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Countdown: Negotiation – The 9th Crucial Skill

Countdown: Negotiation – The 9th Crucial Skill

In the first blog in this series (http://bit.ly/2v8mXJm), I discussed the upheaval in the world job market.  Many jobs will be lost, but many will be gained.  Projections are that by 2020, a mere three years from now, 50% of the labor force will consist of Freelancers. Today in this countdown series I am discussing the number 9 skill Freelancers will need to fill these yet to be created jobs.  Negotiation!

 

Exactly What is Negotiation?

 

When we think of negotiating, what comes to mind?  Haggling over a used car or a piece of real estate?  Beating the other guy down so you get a fantastic deal?

The popular view of negotiating is that it is a win-lose deal.  If you win, the other guy loses and vice-versa

The truth is good negotiating is about achieving a win-win for everyone involved. We all engage in negotiations almost every day whether we realize it or not. Anytime people seek to agree on a task or a concept or a subject there is negotiating involved.  Negotiation is simply the process of achieving agreement on issues that leaves all parties satisfied with the results.

 

Why is Negotiating so Important?

 

As a Freelancer, good negotiation skills are crucial to your success. The first place you will use this skill is negotiating your fees with your new clients.  Freelancers are typically very well paid, and you want to be able to negotiate top dollar for your services.

Then think about having to negotiate between departments inside your corporate client to achieve the goals you were hired to produce.

How about negotiating to bring your client together with other companies to install a new process or system.

 

Where Can I Learn to Negotiate?

 

Lots of places.  And…it’s not as hard as you think.  All it takes, in the beginning, is some thought and preplanning.  You will find as you practice the process it becomes almost second nature to you.

There are lots of books.  One I just read is “Never Split the Difference.” (See the link below).  This is an excellent book written by Chris Voss, an FBI profiler. He starts every chapter with a real life negotiating experience from his long FBI career.  This is a very readable book, with basic negotiating techniques clearly explained. This book is only one of many on the subject.

There are many online courses offered by colleges and universities.  A quick search will find them for you.

Google is also an excellent source.  Google “Learning Negotiation” and you get more than 6 million results to choose from.

 

When Should I Start?

 

Now!  Even if you think you are a good negotiator, you can always learn more.  This job upheaval is already well under way and will only continue to accelerate.  Freelancing is the job of the future.  Start now to acquire these 10 skills needed to fill jobs not yet invented.  If you do, you will be ready to launch your career as a well-paid Freelancer.

Here is the link to Never Split the Difference.  Full disclosure, I am an Amazon Affiliate.

 

 

Countdown: Skill #10 Crucial to Your Success

Countdown: Skill #10 Crucial to Your Success

In my recent blog on the great opportunities for Freelancers arising out of the rising chaos in the world job market (http://bit.ly/2v8mXJm ), I promised a thorough discussion of the 10 skills crucial to your success you’ll need to develop in the next few years.  The countdown is on.  Here is skill #10, Cognitive Flexibility

 

What the heck is Cognitive Flexibility?

 

Cognitive Flexibility is a term used by psychologists to describe the ability to shift quickly from one concept to another.  The easiest way to describe it is to think of switching channels on your TV.  Suppose you have a tennis match on one channel and a college football game on another.  As you switch back and forth, your mind must quickly adjust to a different set of rules, play, and circumstances.  People who are not cognitively flexible find this difficult.  It takes them a few minutes or longer before they can engage in the events happening on the new channel.

 

Why is this so important?

 

Millions of jobs are going to disappear in the next few years.  But, there will also be lots of new jobs created.  The problem is those jobs haven’t been invented yet.  What types of jobs are these?  Data analysts who can help decipher the huge amount of data generated by the internet of things.  Specialized sales reps who can explain new products and services to customers and clients.  Managers and consultants who can help steer companies through this process.

If you are a Freelancer filling one of these functions, you will need cognitive flexibility.  You may be working for more than one company.  Company A may be playing tennis.  Company B, playing football.

Even if you’re working for one company, Department A could be playing soccer, while Department B…well, you see where this is going.

 

How Can I Learn Cognitive Flexibility?

 

There are several things you can do to improve cognitive flexibility

  1. Read – Reading stimulates several areas of the brain simultaneously. The more complex the subject, the better. Add to this by making notes as you go.
  2. Play games. Lots of games. Word games, crossword puzzles, chess. There are lots of online games that will get you thinking.
  3. Make lists of different wild and wonderful ways to accomplish the same thing.
  4. Try breaking big topics down into chunks.

Keep going with these activities until you feel you can easily switch topics without losing a beat.  It’s easier than you think and can be a lot of fun.

 

The Challenge

 

Here is your challenge: The rise of technology is already eliminating jobs at an ever increasing pace.  As this trend accelerates, workers will be displaced in two directions.  Those who are unprepared will be pushed out into lower paying jobs.  Those who start now developing the 10 critical skills essential to Freelancing will find themselves positioned to succeed in jobs that haven’t even been invented yet.  And…at much higher compensation.

Which one are you?

Start today.

 

How Freelancers Will Change the Economy

How Freelancers Will Change the Economy

There is no doubt.  Freelancing will be the future of the American worker.  The shift is all ready underway.  Here is a great article from Vivian Gianga at Fast Company explaining why.

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5 Major Ways Freelancers Will Change The Economy By 2040

The 9-to-5 job is dying. But what will an increasingly independent workforce mean for the economy?

BY VIVIAN GIANG4 MINUTE READ

Traditional work is dying.

By 2040, the American economy will be “scarcely recognizable,” according to a new report published by the Roosevelt Institute and the Kauffman Foundation.

We’ve seen glimpses of the looming changes already: freelancers now make up 34%–that’s 53 million people–of the U.S. workforce, according to a 2014 survey by Edelman Berland. In the next 25 years, this shift will accelerate in a major way towards entrepreneurship, independent contracting, and “peer-to-peer” work on platforms like TaskRabbit. Additionally, there will be major diversification of entrepreneurship as new platforms like crowdfunding and relocalized production become increasingly popular.

As traditional jobs wane, there will be some growing pains. “It’s going to put major strains on our public fiscal system,” says Dane Stangler, vice president of research and policy at the Kauffman Foundation. “We’ve built all of our massive entitlement programs–whether it’s social security for retirement or health care systems or unemployment insurance or whatever–around this notion of a fixed job.”

As we veer from this traditional work model, Stangler says the government will end up losing major payroll taxes, and that’s going to create challenges for our fiscal system unless some “very significant policy adaptations” are made.

He warns: “There’s a whole ripple effect if this is going to be an actual and growing part of the economy.”

The report, which includes insights from 30 economists, technologists, policy makers, and entrepreneurs, focuses on four main topics: the future of work, the future of technology, the future of entrepreneurship, and the future of inequality. Below are five changes to expect from America’s next economy:

1. WORK WILL CONSIST OF MANY “SHORT-TERM” ASSIGNMENTS

It used to be that having a job meant security and success for Americans. Since the recession, the idea that a good job is the centerpiece of the “good economy” was proven wrong, as people realized having a good job doesn’t equate to job security.

A career will be composed of thousands of short-term assignments spread out over a lifetime.

By 2040, the job market will consist of part-time assignments, portfolio careers, and entrepreneurialism. Instead of day-in, day-out work consisting of much of the same responsibilities, a “career, then, will be composed of thousands of [short-term] assignments spread out over a lifetime,” says the report.

In other words, workers will work on short-term assignments ranging from several days to multiple years, and will become employees for their own firms. As this becomes the norm, the vast majority of job growth in 2040 will come from small businesses.

2. THERE WILL BE MORE PLATFORMS AIMED AT MITIGATING ECONOMIC RISK

As traditional jobs–with their health insurance, retirement planning, and tax withholdings–disappear, we will see more platforms and institutions develop to help workers and their families manage exigencies and mitigate risks. These platforms will meet needs in three distinct categories, according to the report:

1. Offer new means of marketing and selling goods and services, like Etsy does with handmade crafts.

2. Provide ways for workers to learn about new assignments, to qualify for and schedule assignments, to collect payments, and to meet such needs as health care, insurance, pensions, child care, and elderly care, like Task Rabbit.

3. Offer training and education programs for workers to connect with the larger market.

3. THERE WILL BE MORE TALENT AGENCIES LOOKING FOR THE STANDARD WORKER

In the past, talent agencies were reserved for performing artists and athletes, but in the next economy, talent agencies and headhunting firms will start to play a bigger role in the lives of the everyday professionals looking to further their career. The report says:

There is not a single model or clear linear path along which the platforms of the new economy will evolve, but it is evident that the profoundly different nature of jobs and work in the emerging new economy will require profoundly different platforms for organizing work and careers.

4. SMALL-BUSINESS GROWTH WILL LEAD TO A BOOST IN WAGES

The rise in self-employment will inevitably increase wages (think: you’re no longer suffering under an underpaying employer). Additionally, as the aging population retires and with a birthrate below replacement, the labor supply will decrease, which will also play a role in boosting wages.

While immigration can help meet new labor demands, it’s unlikely to stall wage growth, according to the report.

5. EVERYONE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR OWN SUCCESS

Sure, you’ll be free from an underpaying employer, but this also means your career success relies solely on you.

The report says:

In particular, workers will be forced to think constantly about their next assignment, the skills required for that assignment, and the education and credentials required to gain those skills.

There will no longer be specific guidelines or career ladders to guarantee a career trajectory. Instead, workers will have to be savvier than their predecessors, because life has gotten much more complicated.

To be successful, individuals will have to be more entrepreneurial in thinking and planning their lives, meaning constantly selling themselves, defining one’s own work, and educating themselves for future assignments. In the next economy, work may be more lucrative and fulfilling, but the idea that you’ll be professionally rewarded because you’ve been loyal to a company will be a thing of the past.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Vivian Giang is a business writer of gender conversations, leadership, entrepreneurship, workplace psychology, and whatever else she finds interesting related to work and play. You can find her on Twitter at @vivian_giang.

 

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Get Ready…the Future is Freelancing

Get Ready…the Future is Freelancing

One of the latest trends in business today is the rise of Freelancers.  If you are not preparing to join this trend, you should be.  Here is a great post from INC. explaining why.

Why Freelancing Will Be Part of Nearly Everyone’s Future


Whether you’re hiring or getting hired, plenty of evidence points to a future workforce which looks much different than it does today.

By Christina DesMarais

Contributor, Inc.com@salubriousdish

 

 

1 COMMENTS

Anchor

 

CREDIT: Getty Images

 

Much has been written about the gig economy–a future in which traditional full-time jobs are displaced by mostly short-term contracts or freelance work. But whether or not the rise of freelancing will be a bad or good thing is certainly debatableThe New York Timesrecently published an op-ed piece titled “The Gig Economy’s False Promise,” while a Wired headline reads “The Gig Economy: The Force That Could Save the American Worker?” Regardless of your feelings on the subject, plenty of evidence points to a future workforce which looks much different than it does today. That’s according to Stephen DeWitt, CEO of Work Market, an enterprise-class platform for the management of contract and freelance talent. Here are his thoughts about why freelancing will touch nearly everyone in the years to come, whether you’re looking for help, or getting hired yourself.

1. Many crystal balls are showing the gig economy to be a real thing.

More than 55 million people–about 35 percent of the U.S. workforce–did some kind of freelance work last year. Experts agree this number will only continue to climb. According to the Intuit 2020 Report (PDF) in just a few years traditional employment will no longer be the status quo. More than 80 percent of large companies say they will be significantly increasing their use of flexible workers. And, the number of contingent workers–freelancers, temps, part-time workers and contractors–will exceed 40 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2020.

2. Companies are trying to solve for inefficiencies and labor spend.

It’s because technology advancements and consumer behaviors are accelerating. Now more than ever, it is critical for businesses to keep an agile workforce at the ready to compete in the face of digital disruption, and quickly execute powerful, unforeseen opportunities in real time. But, if a company hires 100 people who are only utilized 50 percent of the time, it’s a 50 percent waste in labor. “It’s like how the cloud completely transformed the way we buy networking and storage,” DeWitt says. “We used to buy a server and saw it was only 50 percent used. It took companies like Amazon to turn that into something they could sell.”

3. A world in which freelancers have benefits is entirely possible.

Currently, a lack of affordable health insurance means even full-time employees are paying more for–or going without–health insurance. And while freelancers have traditionally been on the hook for their own medical, dental and retirement plans, in the future these on-demand workers could have more choices. What if benefits for freelancers were funded similarly to how invisible taxes at the fuel pump pay for road construction? “Our current labor system is so outrageously inefficient, both in terms of the market as well as policy, that the elimination of a lot of that inefficiency makes the system capable of investing into the social safety net,” he says. “In a world with the right policy that is more automated and efficient, with a significant reduction in middle-men, it would be very easy to tax every transaction in a freelancer dynamic.” Ideally, he says, workers could access such revenue from a savings account for benefits, with employers also paying into the pot.

4. Getting work as a freelancer is dead simple.

Cloud-based platforms which connect freelancers with clients are widely available and inexpensive to use. “Every business will have access to every worker and it will be only separated by search.,” he says. “The middle operators that have historically defined how the workforce is accessed are going away.”

5. Millennials, the largest living generation, want flexibility.

They may engage on a full-time basis, on a six-month project, for an hour, or for a five-minute gig. These are people who have grown up with a smartphone within reach at all times. They crave immediacy, novelty and connection. Working at a company for a decade is something none of them will likely be doing. “When Millennials think about their careers the expectations are so much greater in terms of the experience, the automation, the data that’s at their fingertips,” he says. “Anything other than that is frustrating.”

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Why Your College Degree is Only the Beginning.

Why Your College Degree is Only the Beginning.

You have a 4-year college degree.  You’ve got a good job working for a company.  You are ascending the corporate ladder.  You think your future looks bright.

Think again.

Here is an inconvenient truth.  Your college degree is only the beginning. If you are to be successful in this new and changing economy, you must continue learning new things for the rest of your life.  And…you’re on your own.

Our modern Colleges and Universities are busy educating students to work at a job for some type of organization.  What happens to you if those jobs are no longer there.

There are two trends under way right now that pose huge challenges to almost every worker in the U. S. Economy.

 

Number 1: The Rise of Robots and Technology

 

The current political mantra peddled in the media today is that globalization and foreign trade are causing huge losses in the U. S. Job market.

It isn’t true.

Yes, the U. S. Economy lost manufacturing jobs from 2000 to 2010.  But, studies reveal that 87% of those job losses were due to improvements in productivity generated by technology.  ( http://ow.ly/IQTn30cMTh1 )

It gets worse.  According to Futurist, Thomas Frey, (  http://ow.ly/Ax3z30cOxnM  ), there are 2 billion (yes, that’s Billion) jobs disappearing by the year 2030. That represents 50% of all the jobs on the planet.  To be done by robots and new software technology.

 

Number 2: The Rise of Freelancers

 

According to Forbes Magazine ( http://ow.ly/zGDB30cOxQi  ) there are 53,000,000 freelancers in the U. S. Labor force today.  By 2020, 50% of the labor force will be freelancers.  50%!

Even big companies like IBM and NASA are starting to do this today.( http://ow.ly/pNev30cWysR)

 

Does this mean we’ll all be unemployed?

 

No!  And this is not meant to be a doomsday report.  But, it is intended to be a wake-up call.  Almost every job holder in America is going to be affected by these trends. Knowing what’s coming gives you an opportunity to be prepared. Fore warned is fore armed.

 

Here is the good news.

 

First, Robots will not replace everyone.  There will still be plenty of jobs for humans, but they are going to change.

According to a report published by the Pew Research Center (http://ow.ly/poHm30cOz7R ), there is an argument that, “many jobs require uniquely human characteristics such as empathy, creativity, judgment, or critical thinking—and that jobs of this nature will never succumb to widespread automation.”

This is where the new jobs will come from.  Those jobs don’t exist today. And…the chances are they will be taken by Freelancers.  I believe Freelancing is the career of the future.

 

How do I do That?

 

Yes, I know the idea of becoming a Freelancer can be frightening.  The first time I went out on my own it was 1983. I was totally unprepared emotionally.  I panicked when I realized I was no longer getting a paycheck.  The project didn’t go well at all. I eventually went back to working for a big company.

Today it’s different.  If you educate yourself and prepare emotionally, you should be fine. Our economy is rapidly becoming a “gig” economy.  That means you will be working from one gig to the next.

You should start by educating yourself.

 

The Advantages of Lifelong Learning.

 

Let’s start with what you are doing now.  I am going to assume you like the job and industry you are in.  You have spent years learning about it and you are good at what you do.

What are the aspects of your job or industry segment that could be automated? Think about all the repetitive grunt work that could be done by a robot or a computer software program. Think hard about the people that could be replaced. Get wild with it.

Now, what are the aspects of your job that need human contact? What about judgment?  Listening to customers, clients, or other departments?  Deciding how to improve the computer programs?  What about creativity?  Thinking up new ways for the software programs to accomplish new things? Consulting with companies on picking the latest technology to use?

How many people could be displaced?

Make a list.

Start reading!

Go to the Library. Use databases at the library to find research papers.

Go to Amazon. Get books.

Google trade magazines, white papers, and case studies.

Find MOOCs (Massive, Open, On-line, Courses) in your field and take them.

You have to become the expert in how companies in your industry are going to employ the latest technology.  Because when the changes start to come, it won’t be just the company you are working for now.  It will be every company in your industry.  If you are a Freelancer, you can hire out to lots of them.  At a very good price.

And…you can’t stop.  Freelancers have to be involved in lifelong learning.  You have to stay ahead of the curve.  You have to keep reading, keep thinking, keep interacting with other Freelancers in your field.

It is estimated now that the entire body of human knowledge is doubling every 13 months ( http://ow.ly/Tg6J30cWD7v ).  IBM estimates that in the near future, this doubling will occur every 12 minutes.

 

It’s All up to you

 

Here is your challenge.  It’s up to you. You have to do this on your own.

You must start today.  If you wait, you’ll be one of those out on the street wondering what the hell happened.

You can’t go to school for this. Our education system is woefully behind on these issues.  They don’t have classes for jobs that don’t exist today. Creating those classes could be your one of your jobs.

There are huge opportunities here.  If you start now, think now, read books and papers now, develop ideas now, you’ll be the one getting the well-paid gigs.

It’s a race.  And to the victor belongs the spoils.

 

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